K-ON! Insert Song – "Fuwa Fuwa Time" – Review

fuwa-fuwa-time-cover

Album Title: Fuwa Fuwa Time
Anime Title: K-ON!
Artist: Hiroyuki Maezawa; Kunihiko Murai; Sakurakou K-ON Bu: Aki Toyasaki,
Youko Hisaka, Satomi Satou, Minako Kotobuki
Catalog Number: PCCG-70040
Release Type: Insert Song
Release Date: May 20, 2009
Purchase at: CDJapan or Play-Asia

Track Title Artist Time
1. Fuwa Fuwa Time Hiroyuki Maezawa; Sakurakou K-ON Bu 3:59
2. Tsubasa wo Kudasai Kunihiko Murai; Sakurakou K-ON Bu 3:23
3. Fuwa Fuwa Time (Instrumental) Hiroyuki Maezawa 3:58
4. Tsubasa wo Kudasai (Instrumental) Kunihiko Murai 3:23
5. Fuwa Fuwa Time (Instrumental – sans guitar) Hiroyuki Maezawa 4:01
6. Fuwa Fuwa Time
(Instrumental – sans keyboard)
Hiroyuki Maezawa 4:00
7. Fuwa Fuwa Time (Instrumental – sans bass) Hiroyuki Maezawa 4:00
8. Fuwa Fuwa Time (Instrumental –
sans drums)
Hiroyuki Maezawa 3:59

Review: For some reason, the act of listening to “Fuwa Fuwa Time” filled me with trepidation for irrational reasons that come from the cheesiness inherent in the track title as well as the music video which was just bit silly. Putting irrational fears aside, the song does work within the context of the series by reveling in its cheesiness (which isn’t really a bad thing) and when you get Youko Hisaka to carry the vocals, the song manages to sound pleasant overall.

Youko Hisaka’s performances on “Don’t Say ‘Lazy’” and “Sweet Bitter Beauty Song” have already given us some sense as to her versatility as a singer, and “Fuwa Fuwa Time” provides yet another data point to affirm her vocal abilities. The song starts out with a very catchy guitar groove that segues into Hisaka’s light and fluffy entrance rather well. Hisaka’s voice comes off as being pleasantly endearing in the way she toes that fine line between timidity and determinedness as she tries to draw from her spring of courage to talk to the person she really likes. The emotions that she conveys makes for a perfect match with Mio’s personality and it’s a fun song to listen to with the only cheesy part from the first verse being the call and response part that revolves around the phrase “fuwa fuwa time.”

The second verse keeps the listener’s attention through that little pause in the background music at the beginning, giving Hisaka a moment to shine before it continues on its way with its rhythm and energy. Nothing out of the realm of expectations comes along until you hit that brief interlude with the funky guitar part as well as Hisaka’s recitation around 2:56 which stands out from the rest of the song. Hisaka’s tone during the recitation brings out a mix of sultriness with some agonizing as she tries to summon that courage before becoming annoyed and throwing it off completely in a humorous, but endearing display of frustration. It should be noted that Aki Toyosaki’s silly accompanying interjection marks the other cheesy part about this piece before it closes out with the chorus section along with the song’s namesake call and response, leaving you feeling light and somewhat amused.

“Tsubasa wo Kudasai” seems more like a practice song since its laid-back tone doesn’t have quite the stress and urgency of a live performance and the song sounds better this way. The rhythm is enjoyable and the tempo gives me an image of the girls traveling around on a road trip while singing this song in the back of a beat-up old car. The singing rotation also adds diversity to this song in the way they each exude that sense of joy and freedom they get from just exploring the world around them. Overall, “Tsubasa wo Kudasai” is very upbeat and the girls’ performance makes it a very fun song to listen to.

“Fuwa Fuwa Time” is another addition to the soon-to-be-long list of K-ON! songs that are solid even if their longevity is in doubt. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing since being able to strike the listener in such a way that the song becomes memorable is no easy task, and given K-ON!’s laid-back plot, it’s hard to determine whether these songs are meant to stand the test of time. So within the context of the series, “Fuwa Fuwa Time” successfully brings out Mio’s cutesy, sentimental side, but to ask for anything more than that is akin to wishing that K-ON! pack its BGM with music from Wagner’s The Ring Cycle. K-ON! isn’t a show that’s meant to be taken seriously, and as such, light-hearted songs like “Fuwa Fuwa Time” fit the bill.

Rating: Good

Fuwa Fuwa Time (hoarse Yui version)

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Anime Instrumentality's Founder and Editor-in-Chief. As you can probably guess, I'm a big anime music junkie with a special love for composers who've put out some beautiful melodies to accompany some of my favorite anime series. I tend to gravitate towards music in the classical style with Joe Hisaishi and Yoko Kanno being a few of my favorite composers, but I've come to appreciate jazz and rock as anime music has widened my tastes.

0 thoughts on “K-ON! Insert Song – "Fuwa Fuwa Time" – Review

  • May 23, 2009 at 7:18 pm
    Permalink

    I don’t know why, but I really expected them to keep Yui’s hoarse voice for the single. Kind of disappointed they didn’t at least have it as an extra track at least.

    Not a horrible song, but I certainly think it works better in the show with the music video than it does on it’s own as a piece of music. Certainly agree that this track does not have any long term appeal.

    I do disagree with you on the entire “Don’t Say Lazy” ED album though. Personally, I can see me listening to that for quite a long time to come. I find both tracks on it quite infectious.

    Reply
  • May 24, 2009 at 10:33 am
    Permalink

    @Karisu
    Yeah, I guess that if fans wanted a Yui (hoarse voice edition), they’d just watch the segment over and over again.

    As for “Don’t Be Lazy” I think the problems it faces relates to comparison bias that tilts in favor of “God Knows.” Plus, I think “God Knows’s” concert sequence effectively ingrains it in my memory but good.

    Reply
  • June 9, 2009 at 11:34 pm
    Permalink

    The K-On girls make some good music. I’d rather just listen to their music then watch the show, which for the most part, is stupid, and I watch only in hopes of hearing new music.

    Reply
  • June 11, 2009 at 1:05 am
    Permalink

    @Glo
    Yeah, I know what you mean. The series itself has been fairly irritating because of the blatant pandering that it’s just painful to watch. Oh well, at least there’s the stapler song as well as a few others worth keeping an eye out for.

    Reply
  • August 4, 2009 at 10:26 am
    Permalink

    i find Fuwa Fuwa Time Yui version better than MIO version. Aki Toyosaki’s voice is unique in a way i find it small, soft and girly husky, while Mio’s version sounded more of lingery, and quite irritates me @.@

    Listening to YUI’s version, i find simplicity and easyness in the delivery, which makes me wanna play it more.

    Reply
  • August 4, 2009 at 10:55 pm
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    @frozenfire_11
    I haven’t actually gotten around to listening to the Yui version, but I can definitely see what you’re getting at. Hisaka’s voice definitely has a sort of presence to it that works in most instances, but Toyosaki’s delivery from the songs I’ve heard her sing has that easygoing vibe that you mentioned. That is, when she becomes more comfortable as a singer (and she’s gotten better!).

    Reply
  • September 16, 2009 at 5:41 am
    Permalink

    As what some of the comments have pointed out.

    I really do enjoy Fuwa-Fuwa time. But only because listening to this song recaps scenes in the anime series which I really enjoyed.

    I do, however, see myself listening to Fuwa-Fuwa time months ahead from now and still enjoy it as compared to Don’t say Lazy which I am already bored of. Not because I listen to it very often but rather because the tune starts feeling repetitive after a rather short while.

    The funny thing is, it is only the songs Cagayake Girls and Don’t say Lazy which doesn’t gives me reminiscences of the anime. Which is why I don’t feel attached to them in a way as compared to Fuwa-Fuwa time, Fudu-pen and Hotch Kiss.

    Reply
  • September 16, 2009 at 11:28 pm
    Permalink

    @blur
    My issue is that I have a lot of stuff to listen to, so it’s rarer for me to find a song I’d listen to again and again, which is why some of the albums I rate so highly are really precious to me. Fuwa Fuwa Time just doesn’t deliver on that even though it’s a decent song.

    Reply
  • July 18, 2010 at 11:41 am
    Permalink

    @danial imran
    Well, no doubt the Mio’s VA is the best of the bunch. Shame that she doesn’t sing more often since she does have a great voice!

    Reply

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